CALS Scholars

Meet some of our Chicano and Latino Studies majors.

Patricia Ayala Macías

Major: Chicano & Latino Studies and Business Administration
Class of 2018

My path into Chicana/p and Latina/o Studies was when I participated in Upward Bound in high school at a critical time when I was still battling with identities as a woman, Mejicana, and American. In Upward Bound as part of my reading for my English class I was assigned Borderlands La Frontera: The New Mestiza by Gloria Anzaldúa and Anzaldúa was able to put into words the incredible richness my identities gave me instead of seeing my identities of something separate from each other. CALS has provided the connection and history of my ancestors, critical thinking skills, and the importance of community and culture I use in both of my majors.

 


Yolanda Ayala

Major: Chicano & Latino Studies
Class of 2016

Currently pursuing a Master's degree and Credential at UC Davis

I chose to major in Chican@/Latin@ Studies after being exposed to a Mexican- American Studies course at my local community college. I was deeply impacted by the class, and knew immediately the path my educational career would take. This class helped me develop a strong social, cultural, and historical identity that has allowed me to cultivate an academic identity as well. Chican@ history belongs in our schools, and every student should be given the opportunity to enrich their education with such courses. My contributions as a future educator will help transform future generations. In the educational arena, one has the opportunity (and responsibility) to plant seeds of knowledge, consciousness, and hope. With my degree, I hope to cultivate these seeds.

 


Griselda Madrigal Lara

Major: Chicano & Latino Studies
Class of 2016

Currently pursuing a Master's degree in Mexican American and Latino Studies at UT Austin


Seiri Aragon-Garcia

Major: Chicano & Latino Studies
Class of 2015

Currently pursuing a Master's degree in Mexican American and Latino Studies at UT Austin

 

Seiri is the first college graduate, and the first in her family to pursue graduate education. She first attended Santa Rosa Jr. College before finishing her undergraduate degree at Sonoma State University, where she earned her B.A. in Chicano & Latino Studies with a Minor in Spanish. Her research interests revolve around Language instruction and Identity, particularly in examining the ways the social dynamics of the classroom effect Chicano and immigrant students. Her independent undergraduate research as a McNair Scholar at Sonoma State was entitled “A Waste of Time: Student Attitudes Towards Foreign Language Education” and “Attitudes of Sonoma State Latino Students Toward Foreign Language Education.”