Spring 2015

CALS 165B (Latino Art, Performance, and Social Justice) and Facing Our Truth
Profs. Ronald Lopez, Amanda Martinez-Morrison

Student performers Jasmin Lewis and Audrey Rink and faculty director Scott Horstein from Facing Our Truth discuss the performance with CALS 165B students.

"Facing Our Truth was a deeply engaging addition to my class on  LLatino Art, Performance, and Social Justice.' It provided a great entree into discussing issues of inequality, stereotyping, and racial profiling that affect African-American and U.S. Latino communities in historically parallel ways. " -- Prof. Amanda Martinez-Morrison

70 students in a year-long course for first-year students were assigned to attend performances of Facing Our Truth:  Ten-Minute Plays About Trayvon, Race, and Privilege, performed by students and produced by a range of campus partners.  Following the performances, students were given this writing assignment, asking them to reflect on issue of race, privilege, and violence raised by the plays.  The artists who staged the play also visited the class for a post-performance discussion.

SAMPLE ARTS INTEGRATION ASSIGNMENT FROM THIS COURSE


THAR 160 (Theatre Arts and Dance Learning Community) and Trio Ariadne
Profs. Christine Cali, Scott Horstein, Doyle Ott


“Working with Liz and Carol brought poetry to another level… music and spoken word were unlocked, and that is not a feat normally experienced in the classroom.” – Camila Vasquez, Anthropology major

100 students in year-long course for first-year students learned about myth and ritual in performance by studying Arnold Schoenberg’s 1912 musical masterwork Pierrot Lunaire (Pierrot and the Moon),  21 dreamlike poems set to an atonal score.  After preparing posters with visual responses to the dream imagery in the poems, students wrote their dream stories then read them alongside Schoenberg’s music, played live by Trio Ariadne chamber music group, Green Music Center Artists in Residence. Photo: Ives 101 lecture hall with student visual responses posted on walls; Peer Mentor Alexandra Jiongo reads students’ “dream stories” while pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe, clarinetist Carol McGonnell play Pierrot Lunaire.


BUS 451 (Small Business and Entrepreneurship) and Trio Ariadne
Profs. Armand Gilinsky, Sheryl O’Laughlin and Trio Ariadne


50 students visited with Trio Ariadne to discuss how the chamber music trio brands themselves and independent contractors in the global music business. Photo:  Cellist Saeunn Thorsteinsdottìr and pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe speak with upper-division Business majors.


Dept. of Music and Dept. of Math and Statistics event at Schroeder Hall, Green Music Center
Prof. Dave Kung, St. Mary’s College of Maryland
with Elizabeth Roe, piano and Saeunn Thorsteinsdottir, cello of Trio Ariadne,
Green Music Center Artists-in-Residence at SSU
Photo by Jennifer Ganeles


“Mathematics and music seem to come from different spheres (arts and sciences), yet they share amazing commonalities…” — Dave Kung

200 students, faculty, staff, and community members gathered in Schroeder Hall for this guest lecture on the mathematics of music.  By focusing on the qualities of something as simple as a single vibrating string, Prof. Kung helped unlock a world of musical overtones and harmonics, helping to explain the difference pitches of different instruments.  At different points in the lecture, Prof. Kung joined Trio Ariadne on the violin to play excerpts of Bach and Beethoven chamber music, illustrating the deep connection between music and mathematics.


Fall 2014

THAR 376/377 (Playwriting I and II) and Trio Ariadne
Prof. Scott Horstein


“I loved that the musicians were really able to help all of the playwrights find inspiration to use to write very interesting and unique pieces.” – Renee Hardin, Theatre Arts major

10 students from different majors in small seminar playwriting class spent a class session with Trio Ariadne chamber music group, Green Music Center Artists in Residence.  Students developed new writing based on live music played in class. Photo: Pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe and playwriting student Christopher Mortensen comparing notes.