Engineering Science Catalog

Department of Engineering Science

Department Office
Salazar Hall 2004
Phone (707) 664-2030
Fax (707) 664-2361
www.sonoma.edu/engineering

Department Chair/Program Director
Farid Farahmand

Administrative Coordinator
Ronnie Goodlund

Technical Staff
Shahram Marivani

Faculty
Derek Decker, Farid Farahmand, Brendan Hamel-Bissell, Saeid Rahimi, B. Ravikumar

Emeritus Professors
Jagan Agrawal

Associated Faculty
Elaine McDonald-Newman, Suzzanne Rivoire, Hongtao Shi, Lynn Stauffer, Meng-Chih Su

Adjunct Faculty
Don Estreich, Alex Grichener, Tim Griesser, Chris Halle, Ryan Hearth, Sara Kassis, Ali Kujoory, David Leyba, Shahram Marivani, Salam Marougi, Mario Righi

Programs offered

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

Minor in Electrical Engineering for non-EE majors

Professional Science Masters (PSM) programs,
Master of Science in Computer and Engineering Science
(Two tracks: Communications and Photonics, and Computer Hardware and Software Systems)

As defined in the Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, "Engineering is the science by which the properties of matter and the sources of energy in nature are made useful to [humankind]". The study of Electrical Engineering with focus in Electronics and Communications deals with the processing of information and energy in electrical and magnetic forms involving conceptualization and formulation of the ideas, design to manufacturing to applications of many diverse electrical, electronic, and magnetic devices and systems.

The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) program has been designed to prepare students for an exciting career in designing and manufacturing of electronic systems, communications systems and networks, microprocessors and computers, digital design, VLSI, FPGA, RF, microwave and lightwave communications, and integrated circuits. The graduates of the proposed program will be well grounded in the rigorous scientific and theoretical foundations of the discipline. This will prepare them not only to have a successful career in the industry in the region and beyond, but also to enter and be successful in any advanced level graduate program of their choosing. The technical and liberal arts components of the curriculum provide students with the opportunity for gaining self-development, technical competence, and awareness of economic and ethical responsibilities.

The MS-CES curriculum, recognized as Professional Science Masters (PSM) programs by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), is designed to further the working skills and practical knowledge of engineers, computer scientists and similar professionals and prepares them to be successful in the real world, exposing students to management training and providing practical real world experience through internships and graduate seminars. The firm base in mathematics, computer science and physics is augmented with a selection of engineering course options, which prepares the students for tackling real-world problems.

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

(Electrical Engineering with focus in Electronics and Communications)

Consistent with the mission of the University, mission of the BSEE Program is to prepare students to be learned men and women who are capable of pursuing fulfilling careers in a changing world, and, to fulfill the undergraduate technical education needs of the Community, Business and Industry of the North Bay region. A broader mission is to enable graduating engineers to acquire knowledge and experiences to prepare them to pursue lifelong learning, advanced study, leadership roles in business and community.

The Electrical Engineering (EE) at Sonoma State University is an innovative program in which the curriculum has been designed to provide students with education in electrical engineering with electronics and communications. The curriculum includes (1) 50 units of General Education courses (9 units overlap with required physics and mathematics courses, and 4 units of ES 210, GE A3), (2) a 20-unit core in mathematics, computer science and basic sciences, (3) a 44-unit core in Electrical Engineering which includes electrical, computer, electronics, and communications engineering subjects such as circuits, analog/digital electronics, electromagnetic fields, microprocessors, analog and digital communications, networking, and (4) a 6-unit Electrical Engineering electives which provides senior-level choices for more depth in students areas of interest. Theoretical and practical learning experiences are an important part of all course work. The senior year also gives students the opportunity to consolidate their educational experience with a capstone design project. The curriculum develops students abilities to formulate problems, analyze alternatives, make decisions, and solve problems. Internship and co-op experiences will be encouraged to provide the students a real world experience and enhancing students communication and interpersonal skills.

BSEE Educational Objectives

  1. Educate and prepare students to be successful in the profession of electrical
    engineering.
  2. Educate students to successfully pursue graduate degrees.
  3. Provide a strong foundation to the students for life-long learning and being responsible citizens.

BSEE Program Outcomes

The students will attain:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. an ability to communicate effectively
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
  12. knowledge of basic sciences, advanced mathematics and engineering and ability to apply that knowledge to analyze and solve practical problems in the field of electronics and communications
  13. expertise to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments, analyze data and interpret results

Career Paths and Opportunities

The BSEE program has been designed to prepare students for an exciting career in industries or pursue graduate degrees. The graduates will find opportunities in the industries in the areas such as:

  1. designing and manufacturing of electronic systems
  2. communications systems
  3. networking
  4. computer engineering
  5. telecommunications
  6. optical fiber communications
  7. integrated circuits
  8. research and development in the above areas, or,
  9. sales, marketing and management in the above areas

Some examples of the corresponding job titles are: Electronics Engineer, Computer Engineer, Hardware Designer, Systems Engineer, Communications Engineer, Communications Analyst, Telecommunications Engineer, Network Engineer, Network Analyst, Sales Engineer, Applications Engineer, Field Engineer.

Graduate degrees could be pursued in any one of the many fields such as electronics, communications, networking, computer engineering and computer science.

Program Requirements

 
Degree Requirements Units
Major requirements (including technical electives)* 54
Support courses (Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics**) 29
GE Courses (excluding units in support courses) 37
Total units for graduation 120

* 4 units double count in GE units.
** 9 units double count in GE units.

Engineering Science Units
EE 110: Introduction to Engineering Laboratory 1
EE 112: Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design Laboratory 1
ES 210: Digital Circuit & Logic Design (GE Area A3) 4
EE 220: Electric Circuits 3
EE 221: Electric Circuits Laboratory 1
EE 230: Electronics I 3
EE 231: Electronics I Laboratory 1
EE 310: Microprocessors & System Design 4
EE 314: Advanced Programming, Modeling and Simulation 4
EE 330: Electronics II 2
EE 345: Probability & Statistics for Engineers 3
EE 400: Linear Systems Theory 3
EE 430: Electromagnetic Theory & Applications 3
EE 442: Analog and Digital Communications 4
EE 443: Introduction to Optical Fiber Communication 3
EE 465: Intro. to Networking and Network Management 3
Approved Technical Elective I 3
Approved Technical Elective II 3
EE 492: Senior Design Project Planning 1
EE 493: Senior Design Project 3
EE 497: Engineering Science Colloquium 1
Subtotal 54

Computer Science Units
CS 115: Programming I 4
Subtotal 4

Physics Units
PHYS 114: Introduction to Physics I (GE Area B1) 4
PHYS 116: Introductory Lab Experience (GE Lab) 1
PHYS 214: Introduction to Phys II 4
Subtotal 9

Mathematics Units
MATH 161: Calculus I (GE Area B4) 4
MATH 211: Calculus II 4
MATH 241: Calculus III 4
MATH 261: Calculus IV 4
Subtotal 16

General Education
(excluding Math, Physics and CS courses)
Units
ENGL 101: Expository Writing & Analytical Reading 4
$Remaining GE courses 33
Subtotal 37

TOTAL UNITS FOR GRADUATION 120

$A list of recommended GE courses for BSEE major can be found at the department website or obtained from the department office.

Minor in Electrical Engineering (EE)

The Department offers a minor program in EE to provide an opportunity to any non-EE major student interested in gaining ability and training in the field of Electrical Engineering. Students interested in receiving a minor in Electrical Engineering require 10 units to 40 units depending upon the student's major field of study and the units available as free electives in the major that can be used by the EE minor program. The EE minor requirements are as follows.

I. Course Requirements

To minor in Electrical Engineering, students must complete 23 units of Engineering Science courses, 14 units of core courses and 9 units of electives, and 17 units of support courses in Mathematics, Physics as follows:

Core Courses 14 Units
EE 110: Intro. to Engineering Laboratory 1
EE 112: Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design Laboratory 1
ES 210: Digital Circuits & Logic Design (GE Area A3) 4
EE 220: Electric Circuits 3
EE 221: Electric Circuits Laboratory 1
EE 230: Electronics I 3
EE 231: Electronics I Lab 1

 

Electives From The Following List 9 Units
EE 310: Microprocessors & System Design 4
EE 314: Adv. Program., Modeling and Simulation 4
EE 330: Electronics II 3
EE 400: Linear Systems Theory 3
EE 430: Electromagnetic Theory & Applications 3
EE 432: Physical Electronics 3
EE 442: Analog & Digital Communications 4
EE 445: Photonics 3
EE 465: Introduction to Networking 3

 

Support Courses 17 Units
PHYS 114: Introduction to Physics I 4
PHYS 214: Introduction to Phys II 4
PHYS 116: Introductory Physics lab 1
MATH 161: Calculus I 4
MATH 211: Calculus II 4

 

TOTAL UNITS: 23 units without support courses and 40 units including support courses.

Additional support courses may be needed depending upon the electives chosen. For example, EE 400: Linear Systems Theory requires a prerequisite of Math 241: Differential Equations with Linear Algebra and EE 314 requires a prerequisite of CS 115.

II. Grade requirement

The student must complete each course applied towards minor in Electrical Engineering with a grade of C or higher.

III. Pathway Examples

Examples of the pathways to minor in EE by the students majoring in Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics disciplines are posted at Example Pathways to EE Minor. The interested students should contact ES Department for advising and developing a plan of study.

Laboratories

The Program has the following eight state-of-the art laboratories in various areas of interest located in the Cerent Engineering Sciences Complex in Salazar Hall.

  • AFC Access Technologies Laboratory
  • Agilent Technologies Communications Laboratory
  • Rolf Illsley Photonics Laboratory
  • William Keck Microanalysis Laboratory
  • Electronics Laboratory
  • Human-Computer Interaction and Systems Laboratory
  • Networking Laboratory
  • Software Engineering Laboratory

These labs provide excellent facilities to our students and faculty for hands-on experience, research, project development, implementation and testing. Many of these labs are sponsored by the high tech industries in the North Bay region of the San Francisco area.

Sample Four-year Program for Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

Semester 1 Units
EE 110: Intro. to Engg. Laboratory 1
CS 115: Programming I 4
MATH 161: Calculus I 4
ENGL 101: Exposit. Writ. & Analy. Read 4
GE 3
Total 16

 

Semester 2 Units
EE 112: Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design Laboratory 1
PHYS 114: Introduction to Physics I 4
PHYS 116: Introductory Lab. Experience 1
MATH 211: Calculus II 4
GE 6
Total 16

 

Semester 3 Units
PHYS 214: Introduction to Physics II 4
EE 220: Electric Circuits 3
EE 221: Electric Circuits Laboratory 1
MATH 241: Calculus III 4
GE 4
Total 16

 

Semester 4 Units
ES 210: Digital Circuits & Logic Design 4
EE 230: Electronic I 3
EE 231: Electronics I Laboratory 1
MATH 261: Calculus IV 4
GE 4
Total 16

 

Semester 5 Units
EE 314: Adv. Prog, Modeling and Simulation 4
EE 330: Electronics II 2
EE 345: Probability & Statistics for Engineers 3
EE 400: Linear Systems Theory 3
GE 4
Total 16

 

Semester 6 Units
EE 310: Microprocessors & System Design 4
EE 442: Analog & Digital Communications 4
EE 430: Electromagnetic Theo. & Applications 3
GE 3
Total 14

 

Semester 7 Units
EE 443: Intro. Optical Fiber Commun. 3
EE 465: Intro. to Networking and Network Management 3
EE 492: Senior Design Project Planning 1
EE 497: Engg. Science Colloquium 1
GE 6
Total 14

 

Semester 8 Units
EE 493: Senior Design Project 3
Approved Technical Elective I 3
Approved Technical Elective II 3
GE 3
Total 12

Total Graduation Units: 120

Undergraduate Courses (EE XXX)

ES 101A: Communication in the Digital Age (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Concept of digital age, technology and modern communications, understanding various routinely used technical terms and commonly known computer and communications components and devices; understanding digital voice, video and data communication, mobile communication and communication through internet; ill effects such as radiation, invasion of privacy, unethical usages and protection from them; assessment of learning. (The companion laboratory course ES 101B is strongly recommended; the course does not apply to ES major.) Prerequisite: GE Math eligibility.

GE Area: This course meets GE Area B3 requirement.

ES 101B: Communication in the Digital Age Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Laboratory to demonstrate the concepts discussed in the course ES 101A and give hands-on experience to the students. (Does not apply to ES major.) Co-requisite: ES 101A, or permission of the instructor.

GE Area: This course meets the GE science laboratory requirement.

EE 110: Introduction to Engineering Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. This course is designed to introduce principles of engineering to the students and expose them to the electronics and computer lab environment. The students are given opportunity to design and build some simple analog and digital circuits and make measurements using various types of lab equipment.

EE 112: Fundamentals of Digital Logic Design Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Review of set theory and binary system, digital logic, Venn diagram, logic gates, minimization techniques, combinatorial logic and design of simple combinatorial logic circuits such as 1-bit adder; concept of coders, decoders and integrated circuits. Prerequisite: EE 110 or consent of instructor.

ES 210: Digital Circuit & Logic Design (4)

Lecture: 3 hours, laboratory: 3 hours. Students learn how to analyze and evaluate scientific, inductive and deductive reasoning, through digital logic and its application to logic gates and digital electronic circuits. Laboratory work includes designing, building and testing of digital circuits and designs. Project assignments require students present their own design and the final product in public, making persuasive presentations with efficient verbal and non-verbal skills, and listening to peer's critiques for improvement. This course fulfills GE A3. Prerequisites: EE 112, Corequisite: EE 230, or consent of instructor.

EE 220: Electric Circuits (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Review of Kirchhoff's laws, circuit design, node and mesh analysis, etc.; Thevenin's theorem, Norton's theorem, steady state and transient analysis, transfer function. AC power and three-phase circuits, Y-Delta equivalents. Multi-port networks, two-port networks with energy storage, ideal transformers. Amplifiers and frequency response, filters. Prerequisites: EE 110 and MATH 211; Corequisite: EE 221 and PHYS 214, or consent of instructor.

EE 221: Electric Circuits Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Laboratory work on material treated in EE 220 emphasizing elementary design principles. Prerequisite: EE 110 and corequisite: EE 220.

EE 230: Electronics I (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Theory, characteristics and operation of diodes, bipolar junction transistors and MOSFET transistors; analog and digital electronic circuits; design and analysis of analog electronic circuits such as filters, operational amplifiers,single and multistage amplifiers; modeling and simulation using spice/multisim software. Prerequisite: EE 220 and 221 and corequisite: EE 231 or consent of Instructor.

EE 231: Electronic I Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Laboratory work to accompany EE 230. Computer assisted design of electronic circuits involving devices such as diodes and transistors. Design, building and testing of electronic circuits such as filters, oscillator, amplifiers, etc. Corequisite: EE 230.

EE 310: Microprocessors & System Design(3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Hardware architecture of a general-purpose microprocessor and a micro-controller, memory hierarchy and supporting peripherals in micro controllers, comparison of various micro-controller architectures and capabilities, embedded system design using a micro-controller, data transfer protocols supported by a micro-controller, process of code writing, compiling, and executing programs using an IDE and a simulator. Prerequisites: ES 210 and EE 230, co-requisite EE 310L, or consent of instructor

EE 310L: Microprocessors & System Design Laboratory(1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Laboratory work includes building and programming a microcontroller-based system and interfacing it to various external peripherals. Prerequisites: ES 210 and EE 230, co-requisite EE 310, or consent of instructor

EE 314: Advanced Programming, Modeling and Simulation (4)

Lecture: 4 hours. Pointers and dynamic allocation of storage; linked lists; an introduction to the object oriented programming (OOP) paradigm; classes and objects; encapsulation; member variables and member functions. Static arrays, dynamic arrays, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, binary search trees, balanced trees (AVL, red-black, B-trees), heaps, hashing and graphs. System modeling techniques and applications such as generation of noise (random numbers) and correlated signal with different pdfs, measurement of statistical parameters like moments, queuing systems and system simulation. Prerequisite: CS 115: Programming I. Co-requisites: EE 345 and EE 220, or consent of instructor.

EE 330: Electronics II (2)

Lecture: 2 hours. Output stage design of the amplifiers, non-linear op-amp circuits, differential amplifiers, common mode and differential mode circuit analysis, half-circuit analysis, study of current mirrors and active load design, analysis of two stage active load CMOS op-amp, high frequency models of BJT and MOSFET, analysis of low and high frequency responses of amplifiers, open circuit time constant (OTC) and short circuit time constant (STC), study of tuned amplifier. Prerequisite: EE 230 or consent of instructor.

EE 345: Probability & statistics for Engineers (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Probability and its axioms, conditional probability, sequential experiments, independence, counting, discrete, continuous and mixed random variables and distributions, functions of random variables, expectations, multiple random variables and joint distributions, central limit theorem, weak law of large numbers, estimation of random variables, random processes and their characterization. Prerequisite: MATH 241, or consent of instructor

EE 400: Linear System Theory (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Analysis of linear time-invariant systems, correlation, convolution, impulse response, complex variables, Fourier series and transform, sampling, filtering, modulation, stability and causality, feedback and control systems, Laplace and Z-transform, fast Fourier transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 241 or consent of Instructor. (Crosslisted with MATH 430 and CES 400)

EE 430: Electromagnetic Theory & Applications (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric currents, electromagnetic induction, electric and magnetic fields in matter, Maxwell's equations, retarded potentials radiation reaction, light emission, simple scattering and antenna theory, properties of waveguides, relativistic formulation of electrodynamics, Fourier decomposition of fields. Prerequisites: EE 220, MATH 241 and MATH 261.

EE 432: Physical Electronics (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Semiconductor materials, crystal structure and growth; energy bands and charge carriers, conductivity and mobility; metal-semiconductor and p-n junctions; p-n junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field-effect transistors, CCD's, photonic devices and integrated circuits. Projects in photolithography; conductivity and contact resistance measurements; I-V and C-V characteristics of diodes; characterization of transistors may be assigned. Prerequisites: EE 230 or consent of Instructor. (Crosslisted with PHYS 475 and CES 432)

EE 440: Analog & Digital Communications I (3)

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory, 3 hours. Mathematical modeling of signals, time and frequency domain concepts, spectral density, components of a communications system, analog signal transmission. AM, FM and PM modulation and demodulation techniques, noise and bandwidth, link analysis. Laboratory work. Prerequisites: EE 230, and EE 400; or consent of instructor.

EE 441: Analog & Digital Communications II (3)

Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory, 3 hours. Digital signals and their transmission, PCM, log-PCM, ADPCM and DM and other low bit rate coders. Digital data transmission, data encoding, clock recovery and BER, data modulation techniques, ASK, FSK, PSK and QAM. Link budgets for satellite, cellular, and cable systems, the effects of noise and bandwidth. Laboratory work. Prerequisite: EE 314 and EE 440 or consent of instructor.

EE 442: Analog and Digital Communications (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory, 3 hrs. Mathematical modeling of signals, time and frequency domain concepts, spectral density, components of a communications system, analog signal transmission; Analog modulation and demodulation techniques, FDM, noise and bandwidth; Digital signals and their transmission, PCM and low bit rate coders, TDM; data encoding for efficient baseband digital transmission, digital data modulation. Laboratory work consistent with the lecture topics covered. Prerequisite: EE 230 and EE 400, or consent of instructor.

EE 442L: Analog and Digital Communications Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. Laboratory work covers various analog and digital communication elements, and modulation, and demodulation techniques. Prerequisite: EE 230 and EE 400, co-requisite EE 442, or consent of instructor

EE 443: Introduction to Optical Fiber Communications (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Principles of light wave propagation, and propagation in an optical fiber, fiber characteristics, O/E and E/O conversions, coupling, WDM, modulation techniques for efficient information transmission, system design. Prerequisite: EE 430 and Corequisite: EE 442 or consent of the instructor.

EE 444: Introduction to RF Communications (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Principles of transmission line theory, scattering matrix methods, impedance matching, waveguides, microstrip, coplanar lines, couplers, detectors, antennas, RF filters, RF amplifiers, passive RF/ microwave devices (mixers, diplexers, etc.), RF/microwave communications link design, system noise and distortion, common wireless protocols. Prerequisite: (EE 442 and ES442L) or EE 430, or consent of instructor

EE 445: Photonics (3)

Lecture: 3 hours. Gaussian beams; guided-wave optics; fiber optics; optical resonators; resonant cavities; laser oscillation and amplification; laser excitation; optical pumping; solid state, gas, dye, chemical, excimer and free electron lasers; semiconductor lasers; laser spectroscopy; fiber optic communication; photomultiplier and semiconductor radiation detectors including photoconductors, junction photodiodes; p-i-n diodes, avalanche photodiodes; detector noise. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or consent of Instructor. (Crosslisted with PHYS 445 and CES 430)

EE 465: Intro. to Networking and Network Management (2)

Lecture: 2 hours. The ISO reference model, theoretical basis for data communications, data transmission theory and practice, telephone systems, protocols, networks, inter-networks, with examples. Prerequisites: EE 314 and EE 442 or consent of Instructor. (Crosslisted with CES 440)

EE 465L: Intro. to Networking and Network Management Laboratory (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. This laboratory emphasizes on network concepts and protocols through configuring a network using networking elements and PCs, observing the actual behavior of the overall network, and analyzing and evaluating the results. Prerequisites: (EE 314 or CS 315) and EE 442, co-requisite EE 465L, or consent of Instructor. (Cross-listed with CES 440)

EE 480: Artificial Intelligence (3)

A survey of techniques that simulate human intelligence. Topics may include: Pattern recognition, general problem solving, adversarial game-tree search, decision making, expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms. Prerequisites: EE 314 or consent of Instructor.

EE 485: Selected Topics in Engineering Science (1-3)

A course on a single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered in the engineering science curriculum. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EE 486: Selected Topics in Hardware/Software Applications in Electrical Engineering (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. A laboratory-based course on a single or set of related topics not ordinarily covered in the engineering science curriculum. The course may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing with consent of instructor.

EE 492: Senior Design Project Planning (1)

Laboratory: 3 hours. This course is the first phase of the capstone course. In the lecture part, the students will learn design techniques, how to plan a project, evaluate and perform tradeoffs, make project presentations and write project reports. In the laboratory parts, the students will choose a project, do planning, acquire parts, components and other resources needed and start the project work.

EE 493: Senior Design Project (3)

This is a capstone course. A major project designed to bring the knowledge gained from various courses together to analyze, design and implement an electronic and/or communications system in an efficient and economic manner. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

EE 497 Engineering Science Colloquium (1)

Lecture: 1 hour. Series of lectures on topics of interest in the relevant fields of engineering. A maximum of 1 unit can be applied to the EE major. The students may not miss more than two presentations. A brief summary of each presentation must be submitted after the presentation. The course grade is decided on evaluation of these reports. Cr/NC only.

EE 498: Engineering Practicum (1-4)

Under the faculty instructor’s supervision, engineering juniors and seniors take this service learning training to further their practical engineering experience. A specific assignment is given by the instructor to each student for assisting the class to learn either in class or labs. Regular meetings with the instructor necessary keep track of progress of the assignment and evaluate the student’s learning. Pre-requisite: junior or senior standing.

Questions or Comments:
Department of Engineering Science
Sonoma State University
1801 East Cotati Ave.
Rohnert Park, CA 94928-3609 USA