Curriculum

Fall 2018

Fall 2018 Film Classes

Summer 2018

MA Film classes are generally closed to students outside the program, but for Summer 2018 we are opening a section so other students may participate.

  • MA Film students: Register for the below course online with the permission code sent to you via e-mail. Enter this code in the Edit tab of the Enrollment screen. See screen shot.
  • All other students: Class meeting dates/times the same as below, but register for COMS 320 Section 101, Class # 1166. See the Summer Session website for details.

FILM 510: Digital Storytelling I (4 units)
Class # 1331
4 Tuesdays, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19; 1 Thursday, 6/21
6--9:30 PM
+ online
Salazar 1052

Spring 2018

Spring 2018 MA Film Classes

Plan of Study

The MA-FILM 30-unit curriculum provides a path to completion of degree requirements over two years (four semesters).

Fall (first year)
FILM 500: Introduction to Film and Media Theory (4)
FILM 501: Film and Narrative (4)

Spring (first year)
FILM 502: Documentary Film and Social Advocacy (4)
FILM 503.1: Film and Cultural Studies (4)
or
FILM 510: Digital Storytelling I (4)

Fall (second year)
FILM 503.2: Film and Cultural Studies (4)
FILM 503.3: Film and Cultural Studies (4)
or
FILM 515: Digital Storytelling II (4)

Spring (second year)
FILM 535: Directed Film or Creative Project (6)
or
FILM 599: Thesis and Directed Reading (6)

Course Descriptions

FILM 500: Introduction to Film and Media Theory - An overview of key concepts and theorists in the study of film and media. Advanced use of reference materials and library resources, as well as the techniques of critical and scholarly writing. This course is a pre-requisite for coursework in subsequent semesters and must be taken during the first semester of matriculation.

FILM 501: Film and Narrative - Intensive study of filmmaking practices of Hollywood, independent and foreign cinemas and their varying uses of narrative to address social issues. Course content varies from semester to semester.

FILM 502: Documentary Film and Social Advocacy - Intensive study of a wide range of documentary filmmaking practices and the different approaches taken towards a broad range of social issues. Course content varies from semester to semester.

FILM 503: Film and Cultural Studies - Intensive study of a particular theme and its interrelationships with film and media. Emphasis on specific historical and social contexts and their ensuing representations in both popular and alternative forms of media. Course content varies from semester to semester. Courses may be taken more than once for credit under different themes. Areas of focus include: Environmental Themes and Media Advocacy; Gender Representations in Film and Media; Politics and the Media.

FILM 510: Digital Storytelling I - A hands-on creative approach to the theory and practice of non-fiction filmmaking, and how this medium can create social change. Class exercises cover basic camera, sound, and editing techniques. Students will be given assignments that foster a creative exploration and appreciation of the medium.

FILM 515: Digital Storytelling II - An advanced workshop in how to use new media tools to make short films focused on social issues. Provides students with tools to create and distribute socially engaged films via new delivery platforms.

FILM 535: Directed Film or Creative Project - Individualized instruction in the development of an extended creative film/video project. This project must be approved by the creative project chair and second reader.

FILM 595: Special Studies - Directed, individual study on a particular topic. May require completion of an upper-division undergraduate course in film or related discipline relevant to the student's program of study and will include additional readings, assignments, or projects as determined by the instructor. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

FILM 599: Thesis and Accompanying Directed Reading - To be taken by students writing a traditional thesis, an extended research topic approved and guided by the thesis chair and second reader.

Other Requirements

Before graduating, students must demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in writing; a procedure for fulfilling this requirement is being developed. Students who completed the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) as part of their undergraduate work at a CSU have already fulfilled this requirement; at SSU, this is known as the WEPT.