Faculty Project Archives

Faculty at Sonoma State University participated in several successful small-stipend projects. The projects asked faculty to experiment with new educational technologies and subsequently write an evaluation of their work. The documents contained on this site were written and submitted by the participating faculty

2015 - 2016

Scott Horstein: Arts Integration

2014 - 2015

Target

Faculty who want to create five to six, short instructional content videos that are formatted for online and mobile learning using a constructivist approach.

Description

Faculty choose 5 – 6 topics that can be explained in 1 – 3 minutes. These topics can include (but are not limited to):

  • An explanation of the “muddest point”
  • an introduction of an especially hard concept
  • a brief tour of the online Moodle environment
  • an explanation of an answer to a mid-term test question
  • a sketch, diagram, drawing for a key concept explanation
  • an explanation or clarification of a reading
  • an inspiring or thought-provoking idea
  • ideas to raise or inspire class discussions

Faculty & Personnel

Cathy Kroll, Lead Evaluation

Karin Jaffe Evaluation

Patricia Kim-­RjaljEvaluation

Katee Wynia Evaluation

Cinzia Forasiepi Evaluation

Target

Faculty who want to learn how to integrate iPad and Smartphone technology into coursework. (Faculty with little or no experience with iPads, as well as experienced Faculty, are encouraged to apply. Faculty do not need to own an iPad in order to participate.)

Description

In this workshop series, faculty will learn how to integrate iPad and Smartphone technology into coursework by creating simple videos, teaching students how to make their own basic videos, creating app-based Moodle assignments, developing practices to grade these assignments, and sharing great ideas with peers.

Faculty & Personnel

Carmen Works, Lead Evaluation

Cinzia Forasiepi Evaluation

Karen Canepa Evaluation

Kathleen Rockett Evaluation

Katheryn Chang Evaluation

Emily Acosta-Lewis Evaluation

Nancy Uber-Kellogg Evaluation

Target

Faculty who want to use a rubric scoring-guide to evaluate student work (assignment/performance) and improve student outcomes

Description

Faculty will create a rubric to introduce the requirements of one assignment and evaluate students’ assignments/performances based on rubric criteria.

About Rubrics

Rubrics, often depicted as a grid, highlight key assignment criteria. Each criterion is clearly defined listing related learning objectives, qualities, or characteristics used to demonstrate proficiency. A scale or range is also defined in a rubric to measure an individual student’s level of proficiency for each criterion. Rubrics benefit faculty when used as a tool to provide students timely, succinct, consistent and objective feedback. Rubrics may also benefit students when they are used for self-assessment or peer-review assignments to first determine whether the work satisfies the assignment criteria, and second, to identify what work is needed to demonstrate an increased level of proficiency.

Faculty & Personnel

Mary Ellen Wilkosz Evaluation

Christine Renaudin Evaluation

Renata Schaeffer Evaluation

Emily Asencio Evaluation

Nancy Uber-Kellogg Evaluation | Draft Rubric for Essay Writing

In the tools for teaching workshop series, faculty will learn practices in three areas of teaching: classroom management, effective/efficient grading, and teaching diverse students. There will be four 1-2 hour workshops each month of the spring 2015 semester.

Overview of Workshops

Introductory Session 60 minutes)

This session will present the objectives and ground rules for the series. More importantly, participants will discuss and share what they teach, their teaching-related interests, and what they hope to gain from the series.

Getting through the Stack: Effective and Efficient Grading 2 hours

If you find grading to be time consuming and/or frustrating and you spend hours writing comments on student papers but are doubtful that your comments are implemented, or even read, this workshop can help. In this workshop you will learn strategies on how to grade efficiently and effectively. Whether you are grading lab assignments, math problems, exams or papers, you will leave this workshop with tangible tools to increase your effectiveness but lighten your workload.

Hot Moments in the Classroom 2 hours

Inappropriate, confrontational or offensive statements, emotional outbursts, and disrespectful remarks to the instructor or other students: these are all instances that may arise in the classroom. These “hot moments” not only catch us off guard. They can affect the entire classroom and hinder student learning. In this workshop, you will learn strategies to both prevent these behaviors and to effectively respond when they do arise.

Teaching Diverse Students 2 hours

While most of us understand the importance of diversity, some still wonder what they can do to make a difference. This workshop’s focus is on setting a classroom climate that is affirming to all students- majority and minority. You will learn techniques for responding to classroom instances that may inappropriately highlight a student’s under-represented group identity. Diversity will be defined broadly, and will include a range of group identities including students with disabilities, under-prepared students, lower SES students, racial and sexual minorities. Importantly, this workshop will be specifically tailored to the disciplines in which the participants teach.

Faculty & Personnel

Matthew Callahan, Lead Evaluation

Missy Garvin Evaluation

Tracey Jackson Evaluation

Haider Khaleel Evaluation

Kyuho Lee Evaluation

Lauren Morimoto Evaluation

Emily Acosta-Lewis Evaluation

Jack Ou Evaluation

Charles Elster Evaluation

Brian Gillespie Evaluation

Target

Faculty who want to create five to six, short instructional content videos that are formatted for online and mobile learning using a constructivist approach.

Description

Faculty choose 5 – 6 topics that can be explained in 1 – 3 minutes. These topics can include (but are not limited to):

  • An explanation of the “muddest point”
  • an introduction of an especially hard concept
  • a brief tour of the online Moodle environment
  • an explanation of a project or assignment
  • an explanation of an answer to a mid-term test question
  • a sketch, diagram, drawing for a key concept explanation
  • an explanation or clarification of a reading
  • an inspiring or thought-provoking idea
  • ideas to raise or inspire class discussions

The Premise

Portable, short-throw projectors with wifi connectivity, iPad minis, and $25 for apps will be given to new tenure-track faculty to facilitate group work, presentations, and on the fly, show and tell moments with students or peers.

The Investigation

Will the use of a wifi projector and an iPad increase engagement and student outcomes in classes? Will the use of a wifi projector and an iPad allow faculty to teach using new pedagogy

Faculty & Personnel

Mercy (Hilda) Romero Evaluation

Martha Shott Evaluation

Emily Asencio Evaluation

Tiffany O’Shaugnessy Evaluation

Sean Place Evaluation

Brian Gillespie Evaluation

Caitlin Plovnick Evaluation

2013 - 2014

Bring an Expert to Class using Collaborate Conferencing Software

Target

Faculty who want to invite an off-campus “expert” to present “virtually” by using conferencing software.

Description:

Faculty invite an off-campus “expert” to use conferencing software to present “virtually” to students. This person could be a colleague from another university or simply someone who can add interesting information to a class. The faculty member will work with the Director of Educational Design & Curricular Innovation and Academic Technologies to learn about the software. Faculty will receive assistance with the installation into Moodle, creation of the guest access, and will be on hand when the presentation occurs.

Faculty & Personnel

Carlos Torres - Anthropology - Evaluation

Deborah Roberts - Nursing - Evaluation

Krista Wolcott - Nursing - Evaluation

Project Coordinator: Felicia Palsson, Faculty Librarian

Description:

The Digital Critical Project focused on creating opportunities for students to develop 21st century job skills while investigating new discipline specific content. Researched sources and texts were integrated into new expressions of learning using multi-modal tools. Faculty empowered students with the skill set of new literacies, acknowledging that information is created, published and distributed in many forms.

Cohort Participants

  • Refreshed curriculum in an upper division, research-focused or capstone course.
  • Teamed up with a librarian.
  • Gained personal experience using multi-modal tools.
  • Created a digital literacy assignment to implement in Fall 2014.

Cohort Participants' Students

  • Used new tools to integrate researched sources.
  • Gained real-world skills in digital literacy.
  • Produced a scholarly, well-researched multi-modal project.
  • Learned skills that employers are seeking.

Faculty & Personnel

Armand Gilinski

Emily Acosta Lewis

Jacquelyn Guilford

Project Summary

Data Visualization using Infographics

Project Mentor/Participant

Dr. Jessica Parker, Assistant Professor in the Curriculum Studies and Secondary Education, School of Education

University Faculty Librarian: Caitlin Plovnick

Target

Faculty who want to reduce workload by eliminating one text-based research/data project/assignment and replacing it with an Infographics assignment.

Description

Faculty, using free, online applications, will assign students or student groups to research a topic and create a graphical qualitative data display to share with others in the class. This project will utilize the support of a University faculty librarian.

Faculty & Personnel

Elizabeth Giuliani Evaluation

Jeffrey Reeder Evaluation

Jessica Parker Evaluation

Karin Jaffe Evaluation

Missy Garvin Evaluation

Three SSU Mathematics Faculty have been experimenting with the use of a Wacom Pad and a wireless kit to project writing during class, creating short micro lectures that explain a concept, and creating tutorials. This project will be on-going throughout the Spring of 2015.

Faculty & Personnel

Brigitte Lahme Evaluation

Izabela Kanaan Evaluation

Martha Shott Evaluation

Small-Stipend Project: Creating Easy Active Engagement in Large Classes

Project Mentor/Participant: Carlos Torres, Professor of Cultural Anthropology

Target

Large Classes – 30+ Students

Description

Faculty using Socrative, a smart, student response system that utilizes smart phones, laptops, and tablets, engage students in “large” sections via polling, free responses, quizzing, and educational games.

Faculty & Personnel

Carlos Torres Evaluation

Carmen Works Evaluation

Deb Kindy Evaluation

Emily Acosta Lewis Evaluation

Stephanie Dyer Evaluation

Target

Faculty who teach large sections of 50 or more students, and want to explore options that will decrease the cost of textbooks and/or materials for students for the Spring 2015 semester.

Description

Faculty will explore creative options to reduce textbook costs and increase student engagement via information from Affordable Learning Solutions, OER or other publisher solutions.

During the Fall 2014 semester, seven SSU faculty members took part in the TAP (Textbook Alternative Pilot) program. TAP was conceived by Ann Steckel, in conversation with student representatives and faculty members.

  • TAP organized several meetings for faculty participants to speak with each other and student representatives, establishing goals for the program’s duration. As TAP comes to a close in Spring 2015, the following findings are submitted:
  • Faculty participants discussed alternative solutions to required textbook purchases for students enrolled in courses. These solutions are seen to reduce the overall cost of tuition for students, engage class participants in reading and discussion of materials, and support teaching innovation online and offline.
  • Student feedback for alternative textbook models was overwhelmingly positive. Feedback included positive student assessment of custom materials, lowered costs, stronger connections between assigned readings, class work and course themes, better attendance, and an improvement in contemporary relevance of materials.
  • Numerous free an online resources were explored by participating faculty, including resources like OpenStax and Merlot. These resources were introduced to the wider SSU faculty through invited talks by representatives, as well as representation during the Spring 2015 Faculty Retreat.
  • Student textbook costs were successfully reduced or eliminated in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 courses taught by all TAP-participating faculty members.
  • TAP-participating faculty findings and experiences indicate that SSU faculty should be encouraged to continue exploring alternative, high quality, low cost textbook alternatives.

In conclusion, the significantly positive outcomes of TAP indicate that textbook cost reduction initiatives at SSU should be supported and recognized.

Faculty & Personnel

Adam Williams, lead Evaluation

Brian Gillespie Evaluation

Jacquelyn Guilford Evaluation

Jesse Markay Evaluation

Kelly Estrada Evaluation

Richard Whitkus Evaluation

Sarah Dove