Dr. Jeff Baldwin

Assistant Professor, Chair
jeffrey.baldwin@sonoma.edu
707-664-2195

Curriculum Vitae

Areas of Specialization

  • Human-environment inter-relationships
  • Tourism Geographies
  • Globalizing Economies
  • The Caribbean and Latin America

Educational Background

  • Ph.D.— Geography, University of Oregon 2003
  • M.A.— Geography, University of Oregon 1998
  • B.A.— Finance, University of Oregon

Courses

  • GEP 203: Human Geography
  • GEP 320: Geopolitics
  • GEP 327: Latin America and the Caribbean

Recent Publications

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2017. “Institutional obstacles to beaver recolonization and potential climate change adaptation in Oregon, USA. Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 79: 93-114. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/pcg.2017.0005

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2016. "Sustainability education through active-learning in large lecture settings: evaluation of four out-of-class exercises." European Journal of Educational Sciences 3, 4: 57-80. ISSN 1857- 6036

    Baldwin, Jeff, 2016. “Life, labor, and value: recreating affective food ecologies through interspecies cooperation”. Visions for Sustainability. 2016, 6: 6-22. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13135/2384-8677/1753

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2015. “Potential mitigation of and adaptation to climate driven changes in California’s highlands through increased beaver (Castor canadensis) populations”. California Fish and Game 101, 4: 218-240.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2015. “Beaver as Historical Actors: In Theory and Practice”. Rethinking Wilderness Editor Anita Wright https://thinkingwilderness.org/archive/jeff-baldwin-associate-professor-geography/

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2013. "What Ought I Eat? Towards a Biospheric Political Economy" Environmental Ethics 35, 3: 333-347.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2013. "Problematizing beaver habitat identification models for reintroduction application in the western United States." Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 75, 1: 104-120.

    Lundquist, K., Dolman, B., Lanman, R.B., Pollock, M.M. and Baldwin J.R. 2013, "The historic range of beaver in the north coast of California: a review of the evidence." The Occidental Arts and Ecology Center WATER Institute's final report to The Nature Conservancy. www.oaecwater.org/north-coast-beaver-historic-evidence-review-2013

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2012. "Putting Massey's relational sense of place to practice: labour and the constitution of Jolly Beach, Antigua, West Indies." Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography 94, 3: 207-221.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2010. "The Pacific Asian financial crisis, Indonesian forests, and" us": synthesizing a multi-perspective application of Massey's space." The California Geographer 50: 89-125

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2007. "Understanding tourist beaches as eco-social landscapes: Seeking sustainability through integration of human and non-human wealth production." Les Risques Naturels Majeurs Dans la Caraïbe 7: 43.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2007. “Tourist beaches and sustainable use.” Téoros 26, 1: 40-45.

    Recent Papers

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2011. “Some Problems With and Alternatives to Using Statistical Habitat Suitability I ndices and Historical Presence to Identify Likely Beaver Re-introduction Sites in Oregon”. Conference of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers, San Francisco, CA.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2011. “Promoting Resilience and Practicing Rigidity: Institutional Exclusion of Beaver Re-introduction in the Oregon as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change”. Association of American Geographers (AAG) Conference, Seattle, WA.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2010. “What ought I eat?”: Towards an ethical biospheric political economy”. Critical Geographies Mini-Conference. Milwaukie, WI.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2010. “Partnering with Beaver as a strategy to mediate climate change related water insecurity in the Western United States,” Association of American Geographers (AAG) Conference, Washington, D.C.

    Baldwin, Jeff. 2010. “Environmental history and animal agency.” Annual Conference of the Society of California Geographers, Fullerton, CA.

In My Own Words

    I feel that teaching is a very central part of who I am as an academic professional. Through my teaching I endeavor to help students learn how to use geography as an analytic perspective, and as a body of knowledge which is useful in both career development and in inter-personal effectiveness.

    I continue to develop two areas of research. The first focuses upon understanding and changing some of the philosophical tenants that support environmentally damaging practices. I am especially interested to show various ways that environmental communities work to provide important services to human economies, and to better understand how social groups could work more cooperatively with those communities. I draw specifically from Marx’s ontological work and from the field of eco-feminism in that pursuit. I also incorporate environmental history, political economy, and political ecology perspectives in that work.

    My second field of interest revolves around tourism and the production of touristic landscapes. I have conducted research in Antigua in the West Indies and hope to expand my area of study to other islands in that area. Now that I am at Sonoma State, I plan to pursue a long-standing interest in wine tourism. I am interested in investigating the industry’s environmental implications, the embodied production of touristic spaces by tourism workers and operatives, and the experience of visitors to these spaces. I draw from Henri Lefebvre’s work on the production of space and use qualitative, geophysical, and spatial analysis methods in that research.