Student Testimonials

I think the Seawolf Commitment is a multifaceted benefit to this campus. Community does not come into existence simply due to physical presence, it is something that is intentionally built and constructed by a common element. The Seawolf Commitment is this element that unites the campus in our shared values. It reminds members of our community that we must be intentional in our interactions, keeping the values of the commitment in the front of our hearts and minds. It also creates a safe space. There's a lot of awful and scary stuff that happens in the world, tragedies that we hear about every day, but I know that this campus is inclusive and will support me and treat me with respect due to the elevation of the Seawolf Commitment.   

– Jenna Valle-Riestra, Communications & Media Studies

 

The Seawolf Commitment enhances our SSU community because it brings a platform of unity and acceptance where students know that they can feel safe on campus and are encouraged to to carry themselves by those four words.

– Briana Rodriguez, Psychology

 

I would say that I am both respectful and responsible because I always respect my peers and their personal views. I am responsible when it comes to my mental health and school work because I know that school can have its challenging times and by managing my time I am able to get my work done and take care of myself.

– Rachel Shirhall, Hutchins Major

 

Respect- It’s what makes connecting with others and navigating new situations easier. Knowing that everyone will respect your differences encourages more involvement and development.   

– Alex Sahim, Pre-Business Administration Major, Queer Studies Minor 

 

I use the Seawolf Commitment in my interactions with others by carrying myself with integrity, excellence, respect, and responsibility. I make sure I keep an open mind and listen to what others have to say. I make sure that I take responsibility for my words and actions that may hurt someone or a community of people. I respect those who have an opinion other than mine and I try to understand where they are coming from. 
–Briana Rodriguez, Psychology